Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi Faces Daunting Task To Stabilise Iraq

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The newly appointed Iraqi government must listen to the concerns of the public in shaping the country’s policies, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi’s chief of staff said Tuesday. Mustafa Al-Kadhimi was named Iraq’s prime minister on Monday after two previous candidates failed to form a government. Al Kadadimi faces the daunting task of rebuilding Iraq’s shattered economy, fighting a coronavirus pandemic, and curbing corruption.

The key challenge for the Iraqi government is to develop a truly national agenda that responds to the needs and aspirations of all Iraqis. Launching the report, he said: “This report comes at a time when the challenges facing the Iraqi people have never seemed so daunting. The challenges of Iraq did not arise overnight, and time is not on its side, “he said.

Prime Minister al-Maliki has taken several initiatives and steps to broaden the scope of his government’s national security strategy and increase the effectiveness of the Iraqi security forces. The multinational force and the Iraqi Government continue to make progress in improving the security and stability of the country and the stability and security of its population. The Iraqi army should assume responsibility for security in more areas and take more responsibility for protecting public security and order in the region.

Operation Together Forward is an operation planned and led by the US Special Operations Command and the United Nations Security Council to prevent attacks aimed at derailing Iraq’s engagement and progress.

The Iraqi Government and people continue to need the efforts of the mission and look forward to seeing the crucial role of UNAMI in the next constitutional amendment to promote national reconciliation and the development of Iraqi elections and institutions. HAMID AL – BAYATI, Iraq, said: “UNAMI appreciates the political and constitutional process in Iraq that ends with a constitutional government that supports and guides Iraq for the next four years. Iraqi Prime Minister and President Haider al-Abadi as part of the adjustments to Baghdad’s security plan announced in July.

The Prime Minister made the strongest and most persuasive argument and stated unequivocally that Iraq is determined to confront the deadly threat posed by Da’esh and restore the security and stability of the country and its people and institutions. The United Nations would be obliged to work with this personnel on a long-term, multi-pronged approach to addressing Iraq’s political and security challenges.

To ensure success, we must immediately embark with the World Bank Group on a twin-track road of reconstruction and economic recovery on the twin-track road of reconstruction and economic recovery.

In our recent operations, seven cities liberated from Da’esh, such as Mosul, Fallujah, Tikrit and Mosul City, have seen improved access to electricity and sanitation, as well as an increase in the number of jobs and improved access to education and health care. It is time for a global debate on how best to support Iraq’s transition to a post-war economy and economic recovery. The Iraqi people and are using our instruments to the full to support them.

The international community must provide the support necessary to transform Iraq into a participatory, institutionalized democracy that ensures its people the freedom to fight and make sacrifices to achieve a fulfilling, secure, and prosperous life.

John Bolton from the United States, who briefed the Council on the multinational force of 29 countries, said: “July 2003 marked the beginning of a new chapter in the history of Iraq’s political and economic history. As the country tries to rebuild after years of conflict, Iraqis held their first parliamentary elections on June 30. The development of this democratic electoral process is a crucial step towards laying the foundations for a new, free and democratic Iraq.”

According to the Iraqi Electoral Commission, more than 24 million Iraqis were registered to vote and 44% of eligible voters went to the polls. Nearly 7,000 candidates competed, with a quarter going to women and a third to men. In total, more than 55,000 polling stations opened across the country, with a total of 1.5 million people eligible to vote.

Maliki is accused of alienating much of the Sunni population, setting the stage for the rise of IS.

Another major contender is Hadi al-Amiri, who leads the Fatah for Conquest coalition and has close ties to Tehran, having spent much of his youth in exile in Iran and fighting alongside the Iranians in the Iraq war. While the PMU has played a crucial role in defeating IS, groups under its umbrella have been accused of committing sectarian attacks against Sunnis and Kurds, which it denies. He has helped command the Iraqi army, which has been assisted in the fight against ISIS.

Another major contender is Hadi al-Amiri, who leads the Fatah for Conquest coalition and has close ties to Tehran, having spent much of his youth in exile in Iran and fighting alongside the Iranians in the Iran-Iraq war. While the PMU has played a crucial role in defeating IS, groups under its umbrella have been accused of committing sectarian attacks against Sunnis and Kurds, which it denies. He has helped command the Iraqi army, which has supported the fight against ISIS.

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